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#21 2012-01-12 18:00:56

 AnkazReading

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Skąd: Reading, W.Brytania
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Re: Bird migration

Reminder:

For television viewers who have access to the TV BBC1 channel, either directly in the UK or through satellite coverage, and also perhaps those able to access BBC1 through the internet television service:
www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Today, Thursday 12th January 2012, TV BBC1 will be showing the third episode of the new wildlife series EARTHFLIGHT. It is scheduled for 8:00 pm GMT.  On-line URL link:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0 … ht_Europe/

The series concentrates almost exclusively on wild bird life and flight, including migratory travels. Each programme covers birds from a different continent.  Episodes one and two concentrated on North America and Africa respectively.  Today's episode focuses on bird life of Europe. Preview notes indicate that the birds followed on film will include storks, and also cranes, geese, starlings, gannets, sand martins, and more.  Judging by the two earlier episodes, this one too will  be worth recording!

Happy viewing!

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#22 2012-01-19 20:51:43

 AnkazReading

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Skąd: Reading, W.Brytania
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Posty: 265

Re: Bird migration

Reminder:

For television viewers who have access to the TV BBC1 channel, either directly in the UK or through satellite coverage, and also perhaps those able to access BBC1 through the internet television service:
www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
Today, Thursday 19th January 2012, TV BBC1 will be showing the fourth episode of the new wildlife series EARTHFLIGHT. It is scheduled for 8:00 pm GMT.  On-line URL link:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0 … h_America/

The series concentrates almost exclusively on wild bird life and flight, especially migratory travels. Each programme covers birds from a different continent.  Episodes one and two concentrated, respectively, on North America, Africa and Europe.  Today's episode focuses on bird life of South America. Preview notes indicate that the birds followed on film will include condors, and also giant petrels, vultures, macaws, hummingbirds, and more. "Flying" alongside the birds, we will see some great signs of the continent, including Machu Picchu, the Nazca lines, Patagonia, and the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Santiago.

Judging by the earlier episodes, this one too will  be worth recording!
Remember, if you missed it, you can still see it later on: http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0 … h_America/  - provided you have paid access to that service.

Happy viewing!

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#23 2012-01-26 20:18:47

 AnkazReading

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Skąd: Reading, W.Brytania
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Re: Bird migration

Reminder:

For television viewers who have access to the TV BBC1 channel, either directly in the UK or through satellite coverage, and also perhaps those able to access BBC1 through the internet television service:
www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
Today, Thursday 26th January 2012, TV BBC1 will be showing the fifth episode of the new wildlife series EARTHFLIGHT. It is scheduled for 8:00 pm GMT.  On-line URL link:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0 … Australia/

The series concentrates almost exclusively on wild bird life and flight, especially migratory travels. Each programme covers birds from a different continent. Today's episode focuses on bird life of Asia and Australia.  Programme notes tell us that we shall be watching demoiselle cranes negotiating a dangerous Himalayan pass on their way to India while high-flying bar-headed geese take the fast track five miles above them; in Rajasthan, we shall see vultures, and pigeons visiting a temple dedicated solely to sacred rats; in a desert town, we can watch nine thousand cranes overwinter inside a barbed wire compound; in Australia, the programme shows lorikeets, cockatoos and budgerigars - the latter in a biggest flock ever recorded. Then we'll move on to China and Japan, where the programme follows swallows, swifts, Japanese cranes, white-tailed eagles and Steller's eagles.

Judging by the earlier episodes, this one too will  be worth recording!
Remember, if you missed it, you can still see it later on: http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0 … Australia/  - provided you have paid access to that service.

Happy viewing!

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#24 2012-03-02 16:50:45

 AnkazReading

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Re: Bird migration

Spring has sprung in the world of British birds: First groups of avocets have been observed arriving for their summer season in the British Isles: in WWT Washington, Tyne and Wear:  http://www.wwt.org.uk/visit-us/washingt … sightings/  - see under 2 Mar;  and in WWT Martin Mere, Lancashire:
http://www.wwt.org.uk/news/all-news/201 … nd-centre/

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#25 2012-05-06 18:12:32

 AnkazReading

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Re: Bird migration

6th May 2012

A while ago we wrote in this thread (12/01/2012) about the pioneering project designed by scientists from the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) to satellite-track tagged wild cuckoos in order to map their migration routes to and from Africa.  Yesterday,  this year's initial results have been announced in the BBC online nature magazine, "BBC Nature News".  So far, two of the tagged male birds, Lyster and Chris, have returned to Britain,  one of them (Lyster) remarkably, to an area within 10 miles from where he had left last autumn.

Sadly, Clement, the young male cuckoo which "showcased" the project,  has been lost in Cameroon on his return journey.

Nevertheless, Phil Atkinson, head of international research at the BTO, who personally spotted Lyster, the first returning cuckoo, in the Norfolk Broads on Tuesday, is more than delighted with the progress of the project. The first-ever accurate cuckoo migration map which has been drawn thanks to the satellite tracking devices has now revealed, for the first time, exactly where the birds spend the winter and just how brief is the time that these so-called British birds actually spend in Britain.

More on this in the following link:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/17895997

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#26 2013-09-13 02:07:20

 AnkazReading

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Re: Bird migration

Conservationists committed to stop the cuckoo vanishing from Britain

The evocative call of the male cuckoo announcing his presence to attract a mate is arguably the most iconic sound heralding the arrival of summer in the British Isles. But it is becoming more and more rare to hear it these days.

As previously reported in posts in this thread, populations of the common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus) in Britain are still dwindling at an alarming rate. Overall, the numbers of breeding pairs have  halved since the 1980s, and in the lowlands of south Devon - traditionally one of the cuckoo's key breeding areas - they have decreased by as much as 80 percent.

Work continues on British Trust for Ornithology's project to study the causes of the gradual dwindling of the cuckoo populations. The latest stage of the project has been launched on Dartmoor, in collaboration with conservationists from the National Trust.  The project aims to satellite-track tagged wild cuckoos in order to map their winter migration routes to and from Africa, and then study the findings in order to find the reasons for the decline of the cuckoo in Britain and to take steps to help the birds breed here in larger numbers again. It has already been established that cuckoos leave the UK much earlier than previously believed, and that birds from different regions of the British Isles take different routes to Africa, some more dangerous than others, not only because of weather and environmental hazards but because of barbaric hunting practices in many countries along their routes. More information here:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-23867438
http://www.theguardian.com/environment/ … tory-bird. (this link courtesy of Eva Stets)

But there may be a new hazard for the cuckoos with satellite tracking devices that travel to their winter quarters in Africa. War and political unrest in countries on the routes of migrating birds have resulted in a bizarre but all-too-real danger. Reports are coming in increasingly that  birds carrying satellite transmitters have been captured and "arrested" on suspicion of enemy espionage. In recent weeks, a satellite-tagged white stork from Hungary was caught in Egypt, "detained under arrest" and accused of being an agent of Western intelligence.  When this story became reported in the media, energetic efforts by local bird conservationists  finally resulted in the poor stork being "acquitted" and released to continue on his journey. But there was no happy ending, as within hours the bird - which was most likely exhausted and disoriented by his ordeal - was, again, caught by local peasants, and then killed and eaten. This tragic incident caught the attention of the British media: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article … -Nile.html .

In another, equally bizarre case, a griffon vulture equipped with a satellite transmitter was similarly captured and "arrested" in Saudi Arabia, accused of being a secret agent acting for Israeli intelligence: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world … 93578.html

Let us hope that the migration routes of the cuckoos travelling from Britain to spend the European winter season in Africa do not traverse those countries! Perhaps the cuckoo will be safer than other species, as these birds are relatively small and very shy, so maybe not so easy to capture - provided that they do not fall victims of the unspeakably cruel practices of netting the migratory birds that are, unfortunately, so widespread in the region.

On a personal note, I have lived in the UK for more than 30 years, but have so far never heard the cuckoo call here. I happen to live in the town of Reading, which has a special association with the cuckoo. It was here that the musical notation and the words - in Middle English - of a historically very important early folk song about the cuckoo ("Sumer is icumen in, lhude sing cuccu") were for the very first time recorded,  in the thirteenth century, by a monk in Reading Abbey, right next door to my parish church.

I do hope the findings of the BTO scientists and conservationists will eventually lead to helping that unique bird survive and thrive in these isles, so that I can one day listen to a cuckoo as it announces the arrival of early summer in Britain!

Ostatnio edytowany przez AnkazReading (2013-09-13 03:19:57)

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#27 2014-01-16 03:39:43

 AnkazReading

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Re: Bird migration

A Record-Breaking Bird Flies Sixteen Thousand Miles in a Round Trip Between Britain and South America

In a longest-recorded migratory journey for a European breeding bird, a red-necked phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus) was recently found to travel a remarkable 16,000 miles (25,800 kilometres) in a round-trip flight between Shetland and Peru

This phalarope, a small, delicate wader that breeds in the Arctic regions of North America and Eurasia is a migratory bird, and, unusually for a wader, it normally overwinters at sea on tropical oceans.  It is one of Britain’s rarest birds, with only about 15 nesting sites in the Shetlands and the Western Isles. The birds arrive in Scotland in mid to late May and mate and raise their young before setting off again in July or August. In a reversal of gender roles, the more brightly coloured female often leaves the male sitting on the eggs while she looks for new mates. 
 
It has been thought that after breeding in Scotland, the birds set off eastwards to winter in the Arabian sea.  But a tracking device weighing less than a paperclip and worn like a backpack has now revealed they go somewhere else entirely.  After leaving the Shetlands, a bird wearing the sensor headed directly to the west across the north Atlantic, via Iceland and Greenland, then down the eastern seaboard of North America into the Caribbean. He then crossed into the Pacific where he wintered in the warm waters of Ecuador and Peru before returning back by more or less the same route. 

This incredible journey is the longest recorded for a bird that breeds in Europe, and one of the world’s great migrations, especially for such a small, delicate bird. A single red-necked phalarope normally weighs less than a packet of crisps.

Malcolm Smith of the RSPB said: ‘To think this bird, which is smaller than a starling, can undertake such an arduous journey and return safely to Shetland is truly extraordinary.’   

Despite their marathon migration the red-necked phalarope does not hold the world record.  This is reserved for the arctic tern (Sterna paradisaea), which travels a colossal 43,000 miles in a round trip between the two poles. That makes it the ultimate long-distance traveller. 

(based on:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-25667007
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ … z2qWPI6HXq )

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